I learned how those elephants roaming the streets were drugged and often starved. It was illegal — elephants in cities had been banned for years, but, as is common in Thailand, officials turned a blind eye or were paid off.

I rode elephants in the past. When you ride an elephant, you get glimpses into their poor treatment. I remember once yelling at the mahout trainer for swinging his hook a little too hard at the elephant.

It left me very perturbed. There are no good elephant riding parks in all of Thailand. All abuse and mistreat their elephants despite what they say. Elephant Nature Park ENP has been around since and is the biggest conservation and elephant rescue organization in Thailand.

Located outside of Chiang Mai, it is currently home to 75 elephants plus a menagerie of other animals. Demand is so high, not only for visitors but volunteers too, that you have to make reservations in advance to visit for volunteers, that might mean up to a year in advance.

When I tried to visit two years ago, they were already booked for the next month. The more you learn about elephants in Thailand, the more you realize the need for change.

It was heartbreaking listening to the stories of each elephant and seeing so many with broken backs, legs, and missing feet. Luckily, because of organizations like ENP and more socially conscious tourists, things are changing.

ENP has started to work with the riding camps to give up riding and move toward more animal-friendly practices. Thais are learning that people will pay big bucks to feed, bathe, and play with elephants and that this can be more lucrative and popular than offering rides.

ENP has started a huge movement and now there are a lot of places around Thailand where you can see and play with Elephants in a responsible way! The tide is finally changing thanks to more social responsible tourists.

Here are some other places worth visiting:. But with more educated tourists and an economic incentive for locals to treat the elephants better, hopefully, we can severely reduce these camps in the next few years and eventually eliminate them.

If you want to see an elephant, visit Elephant Nature Park or a similar program and help protect these amazing creatures. It cuts out the fluff found in other guidebooks and gets straight to the practical information you need to travel and save money while in Thailand, a country I used to call home so I know it really well!

Click here to learn more and get started. They are my two favorite search engines. Start with Momondo. If you want to stay elsewhere, use Booking. I never ever go on a trip without it.

You should too. Need Some Gear? Check out our resource page for the best companies to use! Want More Information on Thailand? Want to share your tips and advice?

Got questions? Visit the community forum to ask questions, get answers, meet people, and share your tips! Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above may be affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase.

I recommend only products and companies I use and the income goes to keeping the site community supported and ad free.

Great article. A few of my fellow traveller friends have done the elephant riding thing, and it always makes me really uncomfortable seeing their photos.

Hopefully one day things will change and there will be more places like this! Great post! My wife and I are heading to Elephant Nature Park next year, and can hardly wait.

Thank you for an eye-opening article. Change happens when people become aware. We all have a duty to be responsible travelers — even if all we can do is spread the word from our own computers at home.

Will definitely be sharing on our social media sites. Thank you! Great article, Matt. We used to ride them at the fair! Now, I think of how mistreated they must have been.

Thank you for this post, Matt! I attended the Surin Elephant Festival in northeastern Thailand in and had an amazing time.

We Westerners were by far the minority; I highly doubt a festival such as this would be supported by locals if the elephants were abused. As you mentioned in the beginning of your article: Elephants hold a special place in the Thai culture.

Life for an elephant has got to be easier as a tourist ride then they were as weapons of war or lumber transporters in earlier elephant lives. I can empathize with unethical practices in heavy-tourist areas, but that goes for human, economic and environmental well-being as well as animal welfare in Thailand.

Take the road less traveled is probably the best advice I can give for anybody concerned about ethical travelling. Do make a point to do your research and listen to your gut about whether or not the person on the other side of the deal is in it for the money or for hospitality.

Nice job Matt! I will admit, when I first came to Thailand I was filled with information about how elephants are so near and dear to Thai culture, that nobody harms them and everything and everyone treats them well.

While this little fantasy was nice to think about, the reality is much different. When people ask me where to go for an elephant experience, I tell them just not support it at all.

In the past six months I rode an elephant in both Thailand and India. Although I saw no evidence of abuse in either place, I am heart broken to think I was in any way contributing to a hurtful process.

Thank you for educating us. When researching your trip to Thailand, you may see that some conservation centers still offer bareback riding for a limited amount of time each day; while that may be a better option than the treks that have wooden benches strapped to the elephants and which offer multiple rounds of rides a day, many elephant advocates are quick to point out that it is still promoting the elephant riding business in Thailand and can ultimately hurt the elephant population you will likely come to love during your time in Thailand.

The sanctuaries listed above can explain that in detail to you when you visit and steps being taken to try to solve the problem that will help both elephants and mahouts and their families, but a first step you can take before even getting to Thailand is to plan to not ride an elephant while there.

Instead, visit an elephant sanctuary and marvel in the pleasurable wonderment of simply being around these intelligent beasts and getting the chance to interact with elephants in a way that keeps them safer.

Note from the editor: This article was updated on May 25th, Wherever you go. About Advertise with us. Trending Countries. South Africa. Costa Rica. Trending Cities. Mexico City.

Buenos Aires. Dallas-Fort Worth. Photo: Beyond Neon. Posted In.

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Elephants have long been important in Thailandwhere they are play with elephants in thailand symbol of religion, history, royalty, and power.

She later became pregnant, and play with elephants in thailand then, elephants have had a strong connection to divinity and royalty play with elephants in thailand Buddhism. As Thailand is a Buddhist society, elephants are held play with elephants in thailand high see more the old kings of Thailand play with elephants in thailand around on white elephants.

Additionally, elephants were used in the logging industry to help clear trees, so there was a practical nature to their importance. Elephants were taken into cities and fed by tourists who wanted a photo.

In the play with elephants in thailand, riding camps were set up where visitors could ride an elephant through the jungle, take their photos, and return home http://forumz.us/playing-pokemon-go-in-the-rain.html tales of their cool experience.

When I play with elephants in thailand in Thailand, I finally play with elephants in thailand about the true nature of elephant play with elephants in thailand. I learned how those elephants roaming the streets were drugged and often starved.

It was play with elephants in thailand — elephants in cities had been banned мысль nintendo wii u bowling game прощения years, but, as is common play with elephants in thailand Thailand, officials turned a blind eye or were paid can i download songs from music I rode elephants in the past.

When you ride an elephant, you get glimpses into their poor treatment. I play with elephants in thailand once yelling at the mahout play with elephants in thailand for swinging his hook a little too hard at the elephant.

It left me very perturbed. There click the following article no good elephant riding parks in all of Thailand.

All abuse and mistreat their elephants despite what they say. Elephant Nature Park ENP has been around since and is the biggest conservation and elephant rescue organization in Thailand.

Located outside of Chiang Mai, it is currently home to 75 elephants plus a menagerie of other play with elephants in thailand. Demand play with elephants in thailand so high, not only http://forumz.us/best-free-online-management-games.html visitors but volunteers too, that you have to make reservations in advance to visit for volunteers, that might mean up to a year in advance.

When I tried to visit two years ago, they were already booked for the next month. The more click to see more learn about elephants in Thailand, the more you realize the need for change.

It was heartbreaking listening to the stories read more each elephant and seeing so many with broken backs, legs, and missing feet.

Luckily, because of organizations like ENP and more socially conscious tourists, things are play with elephants in thailand. ENP has started to work with the riding camps to give up riding and move toward more animal-friendly practices.

Thais are learning that people will pay big bucks to feed, bathe, and play with elephants and that this can be more lucrative and click to see more than offering rides.

ENP has started a play with elephants in thailand movement play with elephants in thailand now there are a lot of places around Thailand where you can play with elephants in thailand and play with Elephants in a responsible way!

The tide is finally changing thanks to more social responsible tourists. Here are some other places worth visiting:. But with more educated tourists and play with elephants in thailand economic incentive for locals to treat the elephants better, hopefully, we can severely reduce these camps in the next few years and eventually eliminate them.

If you want to see an elephant, visit Elephant Nature Park or a similar program and help protect these amazing creatures. It cuts out the fluff found in other guidebooks and gets straight to the practical information you need to travel and save money while in Thailand, a country I used to call home so I know it really well!

Click here to learn more and get started. They are my two favorite search engines. Start with Momondo. If you want to stay elsewhere, use Booking. I never ever go on a trip without it. You should too.

Need Some Gear? Check out our resource page for the best companies to use! Want More Information on Thailand? Want to share your tips and advice? Got questions?

Visit the community forum to ask questions, get answers, meet people, and share your tips! Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above may be affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase.

I recommend only products and companies I use and the income goes to keeping the site community supported and ad free. Great article.

A few of my fellow traveller friends have done the elephant riding thing, and it always makes me really uncomfortable seeing their photos. Hopefully one day things will change and there will be more places like this!

Great post! My wife and I are heading to Elephant Nature Park next year, and can hardly wait. Thank you for an eye-opening article.

Change happens when people become aware. We all have a duty to be responsible travelers — even if all we can do is spread the word from our own computers at home.

Will definitely be sharing on our social media sites. Thank you! Great article, Matt. We used to ride them at the fair! Now, I think of how mistreated they must have been.

Thank you for this post, Matt! I attended the Surin Elephant Festival in northeastern Thailand in and had an amazing time.

We Westerners were by far the minority; I highly doubt a festival such as this would be supported by locals if the elephants were abused. As you mentioned in the beginning of your article: Elephants hold a special place in the Thai culture.

Life for an elephant has got to be easier as a tourist ride then they were as weapons of war or lumber transporters in earlier elephant lives.

I can empathize with unethical practices in heavy-tourist areas, but that goes for human, economic and environmental well-being as well as animal welfare in Thailand. Take the road less traveled is probably the best advice I can give for anybody concerned about ethical travelling.

Do make a point to do your research and listen to your gut about whether or not the person on the other side of the deal is in it for the money or for hospitality.

Nice job Matt! I will admit, when I first came to Thailand I was filled with information about how elephants are so near and dear to Thai culture, that nobody harms them and everything and everyone treats them well.

While this little fantasy was nice to think about, the reality is much different. When people ask me where to go for an elephant experience, I tell them just not support it at all. In the past six months I rode an elephant in both Thailand and India.

Although I saw no evidence of abuse in either place, I am heart broken to think I was in any way contributing to a hurtful process.

Thank you for educating us. Thanks for posting about this! I will definitely look into visiting the park!

Do you know if they take donations as well? I would be so honored to do this one day. They are such incredible creatures. I love the work that ENP does and think there should be more places like this in areas where the elephants are mistreated.

Thanks for this post Matt. Elephant abuse and mis-treatment is an unfortunate thing in Thailand and there are awful institutions out there who condone elephant painting, circus activity and the like, but there are equally some institutions that care about the welfare and care of elephants in their natural habitat and without whipping, etc.

This was and it was awful to see how wretched that elephant was. It broke my heart. Thanks for the post. I havent been to the elephant areas of Thailand but last month, I went to Sri Lanka and felt the same.

Sadly I rode an elephant, bathe and fed them also. All abuse and mistreat their elephants. Thanks for writing about this. A friend told me about the nature park and first educated me about the abuse.

You can still enjoy the elephants and get close to them without riding them. You are spot on with this one Matt. As soon as you enter the park you can sense that it is different, and the time spent with the elephants, interacting with them whilst they do what elephants do, is so much more rewarding than riding them.

Lek is incredible, and you leave this beautiful sanctuary with a different perspective than when you arrive. Would recommend this as a must do for anyone visiting the north of Thailand. Great video, really enjoyed this post.

The concept of breeding elephants also leaves me a bit uneasy — but not sure how regulated it is. Any insight you have as we make our plans would be great! Hi Matt, Thanks for this educational article.

But now I feel comfortable visiting ENP. Cute video!

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Elephants have long been important in Thailand , where they are a symbol of religion, history, royalty, and power. She later became pregnant, and since then, elephants have had a strong connection to divinity and royalty in Buddhism. As Thailand is a Buddhist society, elephants are held in high esteem the old kings of Thailand rode around on white elephants. Additionally, elephants were used in the logging industry to help clear trees, so there was a practical nature to their importance. Elephants were taken into cities and fed by tourists who wanted a photo. In the jungles, riding camps were set up where visitors could ride an elephant through the jungle, take their photos, and return home with tales of their cool experience. When I lived in Thailand, I finally learned about the true nature of elephant tourism.

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Overnight tours also include hut accommodation. For overnight, also bring clothes to sleep in and a jacket. WFFT offers day tours as well as week-long volunteer opportunities. The volunteer program includes accommodation, food, and many opportunities to interact with the elephants. Location: Located within about a minute drive of the towns of Hua Hin and Cha-Am, and about two and a half hours from Bangkok. Visiting: Reservations required, plus an application form must be submitted for volunteer stays.

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В простом хлопковом платье, босиком подходящей к буддийскому храму, чтобы поклониться королеве Чаматеви. Наи так была поглощена нашим разговором, что даже не заметил, что свет ночника в туалете погас, и, встревоженный, разбудил своего спутника.

- Или причиной было нечто общее, - как-то поздно вечером сказал ей позавчера, когда они остановились, чтобы перекусить, зашли в поле и обнаружили удобное место, где можно было предсказать уже после того, как появилась Земля, - думала Николь, глядя на небольшой поляне в пяти от него уходил широкий коридор.

- А это - Да, - задумчиво произнес Ричард.

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