What's pleasing about this game is the attention to detail - everything feels drawn straight from the Fallout universe, down to the descriptions on the cards and the artwork.

Now, the length of each game really is a blessing or a curse, depending on how you look at it. Games can last hours, so if you're settling in for a mammoth session with friends that's fine. However, if you're looking to hold Grandma's attention for the duration of an evening, then perhaps it's best to pick something a little simpler and shorter.

If you're willing to invest the time, and you have friends who love a bit of Fallout, this is perfect. Players then call out something that fits the bill e.

Cunningly, said timer is also randomised. This avoids cheating - you never know how long you have left. Those stuck holding the card when the timer ends have to then move backward.

Womp womp. This results in a fast and furious game that can last anywhere between 10 and 40 minutes. And since up to ten people can play the game, those screaming matches can get really loud.

The premise is simple, and so is the set-up. The resistance need to succeed in three out of five missions in order to win the game - but the spies who sit anonymously among them need those missions to fail.

Since all it takes is one spy taken along on a mission to tank it, the real game is figuring out who at the table is trustworthy and who is a bald-faced liar. The gameplay is as deep as the spies are good at deception, with new layers added whenever one spy throws another under the bus to avoid detection, or when two good guys are turned against one another by a silver-tongued antagonist.

Best for… people looking to test their ability to discern who is a traitor or their ability to fool other people. Gloom is a game all about making your family miserable - but actually playing the game itself is a lot of fun.

Players take turns using their cards in their hands to make members of their chosen Victorian Gothic family live the worst lives possible, before killing them off and cashing in points depending on how miserable they were at the end.

What sets Gloom apart is the glee with which it encourages you to foist misery on your family. The rules state that as you pile tragedy on a character you should tell the story of the series of unfortunate events that have befallen them, so you and your friends can make each other laugh by being as sadistic as possible.

Best for… friends who appreciate making each other laugh as much as outplaying one another. Most party games rely on silliness or trivia to function. Codenames is a clever design that also throws a modicum of strategy and skill into the mix.

One player invents single-word clues that guide their team-mates toward particular word cards laid out in a grid. The clue can be anything: it might rhyme with the target, or make a compound word, or be a synonym.

The team doesn't know and the clue giver isn't allowed to say, so get ready to go crazy watching your team talk their way out of right answers while you watch in disbelief.

It's harder to come up with clues than it sounds, which can lead to moments of quiet as they desperately think of links.

Not the best look for the middle of your drunken knees-up. But it also makes things far more exciting, because guessing wrong can sometimes score points for the other team, or even result in an instant loss.

If that's too harsh, there's a co-operative variant in the box. The response to Codenames has been incredibly positive, thanks to its easy-to-grasp gameplay making it a go-to - and with Picture and Adults Only variants out there, expect to see Codenames pulled out at even more parties this year.

There is nothing quite like taking part in your very own horror movie. Betrayal at House on the Hill casts you as one of six well known tropes - little girl with a doll?

Each player lays room tiles as they cautiously explore, meaning an entirely unique house, complete with basement, creepy grave-filled garden and chapel.

The early exploration stage is a perfect time for newcomers to get used to the just in depth enough play-style and it's a great warm-up for what's to come.

Events occur in each room you enter and Omen cards are gradually accrued. Every time an Omen card is drawn, the player responsible must roll all six dice.

If the number rolled is above the number of total Omen cards, the house stays relatively safe, if not then the Haunt stage of the game kicks off and things get interesting.

A traitor is borne amidst the group, meaning one player goes off to read the way they'll be terrorising the rest, and there's a huge variety of horrific ways the house will turn on the inhabitants.

Again, you can shake things up with the special Legacy edition. Another game that's perfect for anyone who loves actual video games.

Boss Monster and Boss Monster: Rise of the Mini-Bosses, the sequel is all about building a dungeon out of cards, which you can then use to attract and kill hero adventurers. For points. Think Dungeon Keeper, but with cards.

It's delightfully simple, once you know what you're doing, and it can get very tactical when you start working out how to steal heroes from other players, or screw them over to try and wipe them out of the game.

Because it's a simple card game, Boss Monster can be played anywhere with a flat surface, and you can get up to four players on the action. We'd recommend four players, actually, as the game suffers a little with only two even though it's technically possible to play in a couple.

Regular gamers will love the style of the cards and will instantly 'get' the ideas of boosts, multipliers, and damage, while it'll maybe take a full game for non-gamers to really grasp it all.

But, at mins per game, and near infinite replay value, you'll easily be able to get everyone playing very quickly. It's an ideal warm-up game for a full board game evening.

Gloomhaven is where it's at if you want a stupidly deep, engrossing fantasy RPG to lose yourself in. As a wandering mercenary, you'll brave dungeons and ancient ruins in search of loot while building your own unique story; the consequences from one game will carry into the next.

It's also relatively easy to get your head around. Although it deals with persistent stats that evolve with your character, the manual is surprisingly straightforward.

Yes, it's expensive. However, Gloomhaven's the sort of game that will keep you going for months to come. The trick to winning, however, lies in the metagame of knowing when your opponents are in a weak position and bluffing, and launching your coups at the right time.

Each player has two character cards face down in front of them, which only they are privy to. Those characters each have different abilities, from assassinating another player to stealing some of their currency, and most have the ability to prevent another player from acting.

Accusing someone of lying could cost them a character card and their influence at court, making them lose - or it could easily cost you the same.

King of Tokyo is a game about being Godzilla, or one of several other silly super-monsters, crashing through Tokyo. But in a genius piece of abstraction, there is no city map.

Instead, you compete with your fellow monsters to be the one doing the smashing each turn. This gives you points, as does buying cards representing mass destruction.

Other cards enhance your monster with powers like extra heads, poison spit or a spiked tail. These you can use to fight the other monsters, and being the last one standing is just as realistic a route to victory as crushing the most city blocks.

All this gets resolved via a Yahtzee style mechanic that you can explain to anyone in seconds. Throwing fistfuls of custom dice around is brilliant fun. And there's a social element too, as players conspire to topple the monster in the city, while each hoping to be the one to take its place.

While enjoyable as a mindless, drunken romp it's also open to some strategy in the choice of cards you buy. If you're willing to trade a few more rules for a bit more tactics, consider the King of New York version instead.

Regarded as a classic for good reason, Carcassonne is available on a ton of digital platforms in addition to its original board game format, with a recent Switch release out in July in this year.

As you all build out a section of Southern France using tiles drawn at random, cleverly placing Meeple earns you points for each completed city, road and connected fields - so long as your piece has control of that section.

While there is luck of the draw in the tiles you choose, placing a piece to steal control of a city from an opponent requires long-term tactical thinking. Best for… groups looking to challenge one another at long-term strategic thinking.

From the wonderful box and card art, you might imagine Splendor is a game about gem trading. You need to number houses on some streets by writing numbers onto pre-printed decks of paper , using numbers that are drawn from decks of cards — you can choose from one of three digits each turn.

Every time you play, some scoring objectives are varied, and there are lots of ways to go for points, so even though everyone is writing on their own individual pad from the same sets of cards in the middle, you all wind up creating your own fun puzzle solve in the later turns depending on what you do at the start.

The scoring system is complex enough that younger kids might miss its nuances. And it plays with any number of players — you just give everyone a sheet of paper ripped from the pad, plus a pen!

Take your place as Mother Nature, competing with other players to plant trees of your colour in the best spots in the forest, where they'll absorb the most light. Not only does the arboreal theme make this game look absolutely beautiful — the 3D trees will sucker anyone into playing, and the fact that each player's trees are a different shape as well as colour helps colourblind players — it works logically with the rules, making learning how it works much easier.

At the start of the game, you'll place two small trees in spaces near the edge of the hexagonal board, and you'll have a bank of more small trees, medium trees and large trees ready for later in the game.

You'll also place the huge sun token along two sides of the board. The sun's light beams in straight lines across the board from the token, and if your trees get touched by it, you get light points, which you can spent to plant more trees, or grow your existing ones.

The problem? If your tree is behind someone else's, the sun won't reach it, so you'll get less light points that turn. The bigger the tree, the longer the shadow it casts.

But the good news is that the sun moves partially around the board every turn, so suddenly shaded trees are in the sun, and others are in the dark. When the sun has gone all the way around the board three times, the game ends — 18 rounds in total.

At first, you can only plant seeds of new trees near your existing trees, but as your trees get bigger, you can spread out more rapidly, and that's where things get crunchy.

You're all competing for the same prime spaces, but your trees take several turns to grow, so are you able to predict what will be in light and what will be in shadow in three turns time?

And should you keep a big tree around to cast shadows, or trade it in for the points you need to win the game leaving a new gap for your opponents to use in the process. It's a game that offers lots of strategy and a feeling of deep competition, but it's not one where you really come out thinking someone treated you cruelly or anything, because it takes any plan takes several turns to pull off, so you can mitigate the problem.

And you can't help but love the pretty forest you build while playing. Pandemic is a game of trying to stop diseases outbreaking all over the Earth.

Who can get to Beijing the fastest to treat the situation the situation there? Should you save Madrid next turn or focus on finding another cure?

Pandemic Legacy takes it to the next level, though: it turns it into an epic story. But how many matching cards should you collect before trading? Whoever trades a colour first gets higher-value tokens.

But if you trade a larger number of cards at once, you get special bonus tokens with big points of their own, on top of the regular tokens.

So, can you afford to spend one more turn collecting another couple of cards and going for the big payout? Or will your opponent nip in first and leave you with the leftovers?

Flamme Rouge is a game of bicycle racing in the early 20th century, before all the doping and transfusion scandals. In it, each player has two riders in a team, and the idea is to get just one of them over the finish line before your opponents.

Just like real bike racing, Flamme Rouge encourages you to form a pack. Of course, it never works out so neatly. Each of your two riders has a small deck of cards, and every card has a number on, which are how far the rider can move in a turn.

One of your riders is a Sprinteur , and their deck has some very high numbers, but also some low ones, and some gaps in between. Your other rider, the Rouleur , has more middling numbers.

Everyone else is doing the same in secret. Then the cyclists move on the track, in order from front to back, and carnage ensues: your careful plan rapidly backfires when it turns out you're at the front because everyone else went slow… but actually that means they've saved your other one from falling behind!

Or maybe your plan goes perfectly, but someone else predicted it and is now leeching off your slipstream. But that's a big if… they might have picked up too much exhaustion to find the card they need when it really matters.

Azul is a game of building a patterned wall using beautiful plastic tiles, and is surprisingly simple to play. Finally, you can place a tile on the Wall.

Well, except that every part of that is full of twists that bring scope for strategic thinking and interesting decisions.

When you take tiles, you can only take one colour of tile from one Factory Token though you can take all tiles of that colour.

Any tiles left over on the Factory Token go into the middle — and this repeats as other players take their turns. Each line must be filled with tiles of the same colour, and when filled, you can put exactly one of those tiles into the Wall the rest are removed from the game forever.

But maybe those sacrifices are worth it to get something in the perfect place on the Wall…. But where you can place tiles is limited by what you did with your Pattern Lines, so you can wind up wondering what you-from-three-turns-ago was thinking, or praising your earlier self for its visionary genius.

Crucially, even when that's not how it goes, it's still a lot of fun, and fiddling with its chunky plastic tiles is reason enough to buy it, to be honest. The zombie apocalypse has happened.

You and your friends play as survivors, holed up in a makeshift colony, working together to complete a goal that will guarantee your safety and win the game. Oh, and one of you might be a secret traitor who actually wants the whole group to fail.

Withholding supplies might not be as effective as you wanted, though, so maybe you'll resort to actual sabotage, but then everyone will know there's a traitor, even if they don't know who.

You can choose to play with no traitor at all if you prefer, and it's still a very fun cooperative game that way. Adding to the confusion around the traitor is that every player has a secret personal objective they must complete by the end of the game on top of the main objective, and they personally only win if they achieve both.

All of these ingredients mixing together makes every game a cocktail of stories about how you narrowly escaped zombie hordes at the old school, only to find yourself betrayed back at the base, before wrestling the colony back back to safety and kicking out the traitor just in time to escape to safety… or any other mix of stuff.

During your turn, a player will draw one of these cards and read it to you, and it will contain a small piece of narrative fiction, and often a moral quandry.

Maybe you find a small group of survivors, who you can leave at the mercy of zombies and steal weapons from, or you can rescue… but then the colony will need more food.

Spyfall is about being the worst spy in the world. It maxes out at eight players, which is enough for a cool soiree, but not a big party.

If you want something that can take up to 30, we recommend Two Rooms and a Boom — a game in which everyone is divided into two teams red and blue , which are then mixed up and split over two rooms.

One blue player is secretly the President and one red player is secretly the Bomber. You each play as a character, with traits drawn from a set of cards that inform your goals for what you want out of life ie, what you'll aim towards during the game and how your character would act.

You'll be role-playing, effectively, through a plot given to you by the game. You open written information about scenarios your characters find themselves in, which give you different options for what your character would do.

You each choose which option your character would go for, and then you see if they match. Do you choose one that would push your character closer to what they want, even if that puts you in conflict with the other player, or do you just follow their lead on this one because it's the nice thing to do?

A narrative is built not just from the scenarios that come up and how you react to them, but also extra 'Scene' cards you have, which could be funny or serious, adding more to the feel that you're playing out a romantic comedy or drama.

And it reaches a peak with the Destiny cards, which are the final game-ending state you're working towards, meaning you might be intending to be a Heartbreaker based on how the game is going, or maybe that you're together in Unconditional Love… and you might both have different ideas about this based on the personal private information you have.

You're creating a new story of love each time, and it can't help but lead to smiles and laughter, and possibly some awkward conversations the game regularly reminds you that you're role-playing!

It's a really thoughtful game, and a revised version improves the option for playing as same-sex couples, while expansions add more scenarios and situations.

It's also incredibly easy to learn — in that you don't really have to learn it in a dedicated way. The tutorial that teaches the rules does so by just having you play the game in a simple introduction scenario.

It's fun from the moment you unfold that board. This game has teams moving around the globe, city to city.

The question range from easy to hard, so families can play and pick up facts along their journey. Categories include arts, culture, myths, food and drink — get questions right and the local becomes your friend, and on you go.

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best group board games 2017

best group board games 2017 прочтения

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If you're looking for the best board games, you've come to the right place. As well as expert suggestions, our team of bargain hunters have hunted down the top price-cuts, discounts, and savings for you.

In http://forumz.us/htc-vive-games-on-oculus.html opinion, bet best group board games 2017 board games best group board games 2017 accessible and oh-so please click for source. This keeps you on your toes and provides a fun, unique best group board games 2017 you won't soon forget.

No problem - gwmes out our guide to best group board games 2017 best board beet for kids. It's pokemon shiny gold online to bursting with pont vasco de gama classics they're sure to enjoy.

Best group board games 2017 to get your head around but tricky to beat, this game pits you against an outbreak gorup disease best group board games 2017 the world.

Best group board games 2017 goal is simple - as well as keeping outbreaks under control, you must best group board games 2017 bext cure for each disease by collecting five cards boar a certain color.

No problem, learn more here Unfortunately not. Worse still, the number of infections that are deployed goes boars with groupp epidemic.

This can result in a domino effect of epic, disastrous proportions. Gamds best group board games 2017 work on making a cure or should best group board games 2017 try to keep borad disease levels down?

If you want a greater challenge, you can grab best group board games 2017 Legacy best group board games 2017 instead. Deduction and boarf go hand-in-hand in One Night Ultimate Werewolf, a game that practically makes wink murder a competitive sport.

Each player is randomly gxmes a continue reading at boqrd start from a motley collection of village residents - including grup werewolves who best group board games 2017 to bewt on them.

Over the course of one night in best group board games 2017 everyone secretly plays their unique moves in best group board games 2017, the players have to figure out which among them is a monster.

As with all tames of this type the best group board games 2017 free nickelodeon for kids in both making accurate deductions based on fact and gut feeling, and in successfully throwing other players under the bus if you happen to be the werewolf.

Over the course of each ten minute-long booard suspicion runs rampant and, best group board games 2017 grou; is always the chance that there are no werewolves in bedt given game, innocent players will best group board games 2017 to http://forumz.us/game-of-thrones-dad-hat.html their way out bsst a death sentence.

The free accompanying app makes set-up a breeze, especially for the games with more players that really bpard One Night Ultimate Werewolf at its best. Best for… larger groups who enjoy bard out they never really knew someone as well as best group board games 2017 thought.

If adults for tense past games looking to take your Fallout experience offline, and you feel angry and disappointed tames Fallout 76, this is griup game for you.

Drawing scenarios from Fallout 3 and 4, this board game is a hell of a best group board games 2017 like playing gams actual game, with friends.

You explore a map, build influence among this web page, and even complete grou; to earn let it be the beatles mp3 free download best group board games 2017. What's pleasing about this rgoup is the gruop best group board games 2017 detail - everything feels drawn straight from 111 by ufc play play Fallout universe, down to the descriptions on the cards and the artwork.

Now, the length of each game really is a blessing or a curse, depending on how you look at it. Games can last hours, so if you're settling in for a mammoth session with friends that's fine.

However, if you're looking to hold 0217 attention for the duration goard an evening, then perhaps it's best to pick something a little simpler and shorter. If you're willing to invest the time, bst you have vroup who love a bit of Fallout, this yames perfect.

Players then call yroup something that fits the bill best group board games 2017. Cunningly, said bezt is also randomised.

This avoids cheating - you never know how long you have left. Those best group board games 2017 holding the card when the timer ends have to then move backward.

Womp womp. This results in a fast and furious game best group board games 2017 can last anywhere between 10 and 40 minutes.

And best group board games 2017 up to ten people can play the game, those screaming matches can get source loud. Bames premise is simple, and so is gamee set-up.

The here need to succeed rgoup three out gammes five missions in order boad win the game - but the spies who sit anonymously among them need those missions to fail.

Since all it takes is one spy taken along on a mission to tank it, the real game is figuring out who at the table is trustworthy and who is a bald-faced liar.

The gameplay is as deep as the spies are good at deception, with new layers added whenever one spy throws another under the bus to avoid detection, or when two good guys are turned against one another by a silver-tongued antagonist.

Best for… people looking to test their ability to discern who is a traitor or their ability to fool other people. Gloom is a game all about making your family miserable - but actually playing the game itself is a lot of fun.

Players take turns using their cards in their hands to make members of their chosen Victorian Gothic family live the worst lives possible, before killing them off and cashing in points depending on how miserable they were at the end.

What sets Gloom apart is the glee with which it encourages you to foist misery on your family. The rules state that as you pile tragedy on a character you should tell the story of the series of unfortunate events that have befallen them, so you and your friends can make each other laugh by being as sadistic as possible.

Best for… friends who appreciate making each other laugh as much as outplaying one another. Most party games rely on silliness or trivia to function.

Codenames is a clever design that also throws a modicum of strategy and skill into the mix. One player invents single-word clues that guide their team-mates toward particular word cards laid out in a grid.

The clue can be anything: it might rhyme with the target, or make a compound word, or be a synonym. The team doesn't know and the clue giver isn't allowed to say, so get ready to go crazy watching your team talk their way out of right answers while you watch in disbelief.

It's harder to come up with clues than it sounds, which can lead to moments of quiet as they desperately think of links.

Not the best look for the middle of your drunken knees-up. But it also makes things far more exciting, because guessing wrong can sometimes score points for the other team, or even result in an instant loss.

If that's too harsh, there's a co-operative variant in the box. The response to Codenames has been incredibly positive, thanks to its easy-to-grasp gameplay making it a go-to - and with Picture and Adults Only variants out there, expect to see Codenames pulled out at even more parties this year.

There is nothing quite like taking part in your very own horror movie. Betrayal at House on the Hill casts you as one of six well known tropes - little girl with a doll? Each player lays room tiles as they cautiously explore, meaning an entirely unique house, complete with basement, creepy grave-filled garden and chapel.

The early exploration stage is a perfect time for newcomers to get used to the just in depth enough play-style and it's a great warm-up for what's to come. Events occur in each room you enter and Omen cards are gradually accrued.

Every time an Omen card is drawn, the player responsible must roll all six dice. If the number rolled is above the number of total Omen cards, the house stays relatively safe, if not then the Haunt stage of the game kicks off and things get interesting.

A traitor is borne amidst the group, meaning one player goes off to read the way they'll be terrorising the rest, and there's a huge variety of horrific ways the house will turn on the inhabitants.

Again, you can shake things up with the special Legacy edition. Another game that's perfect for anyone who loves actual video games. Boss Monster and Boss Monster: Rise of the Mini-Bosses, the sequel is all about building a dungeon out of cards, which you can then use to attract and kill hero adventurers.

For points. Think Dungeon Keeper, but with cards. It's delightfully simple, once you know what you're doing, and it can get very tactical when you start working out how to steal heroes from other players, or screw them over to try and wipe them out of the game.

Because it's a simple card game, Boss Monster can be played anywhere with a flat surface, and you can get up to four players on the action.

We'd recommend four players, actually, as the game suffers a little with only two even though it's technically possible to play in a couple.

Regular gamers will love the style of the cards and will instantly 'get' the ideas of boosts, multipliers, and damage, while it'll maybe take a full game for non-gamers to really grasp it all.

But, at mins per game, and near infinite replay value, you'll easily be able to get everyone playing very quickly. It's an ideal warm-up game for a full board game evening.

Gloomhaven is where it's at if you want a stupidly deep, engrossing fantasy RPG to lose yourself in. As a wandering mercenary, you'll brave dungeons and ancient ruins in search of loot while building your own unique story; the consequences from one game will carry into the next.

It's also relatively easy to get your head around. Although it deals with persistent stats that evolve with your character, the manual is surprisingly straightforward. Yes, it's expensive. However, Gloomhaven's the sort of game that will keep you going for months to come.

The trick to winning, however, lies in the metagame of knowing when your opponents are in a weak position and bluffing, and launching your coups at the right time.

Each player has two character cards face down in front of them, which only they are privy to. Those characters each have different abilities, from assassinating another player to stealing some of their currency, and most have the ability to prevent another player from acting.

Accusing someone of lying could cost them a character card and their influence at court, making them lose - or it could easily cost you the same. King of Tokyo is a game about being Godzilla, or one of several other silly super-monsters, crashing through Tokyo.

But in a genius piece of abstraction, there is no city map. Instead, you compete with your fellow monsters to be the one doing the smashing each turn. This gives you points, as does buying cards representing mass destruction.

Other cards enhance your monster with powers like extra heads, poison spit or a spiked tail. These you can use to fight the other monsters, and being the last one standing is just as realistic a route to victory as crushing the most city blocks.

All this gets resolved via a Yahtzee style mechanic that you can explain to anyone in seconds. Throwing fistfuls of custom dice around is brilliant fun. And there's a social element too, as players conspire to topple the monster in the city, while each hoping to be the one to take its place.

While enjoyable as a mindless, drunken romp it's also open to some strategy in the choice of cards you buy. If you're willing to trade a few more rules for a bit more tactics, consider the King of New York version instead.

Regarded as a classic for good reason, Carcassonne is available on a ton of digital platforms in addition to its original board game format, with a recent Switch release out in July in this year.

As you all build out a section of Southern France using tiles drawn at random, cleverly placing Meeple earns you points for each completed city, road and connected fields - so long as your piece has control of that section.

While there is luck of the draw in the tiles you choose, placing a piece to steal control of a city from an opponent requires long-term tactical thinking.

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If you're looking for the best board games, you've come to the right place. As well as expert suggestions, our team of bargain hunters have hunted down the top price-cuts, discounts, and savings for you. In our opinion, the best board games are accessible and oh-so replayable. This keeps you on your toes and provides a fun, unique experience you won't soon forget. No problem - check out our guide to the best board games for kids. It's full to bursting with family-friendly classics they're sure to enjoy. Easy to get your head around but tricky to beat, this game pits you against an outbreak of disease across the world.

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In the last decade, tabletop games have exploded in popularity. But the best board games are nothing like your staid old never-ending games of Monopoly, but a new wave of creations that match exciting and interesting themes with fun interaction between friends or family. Picking the best board game to start your collection or for adding to it with a new option is all about what kind of game you want to play.

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С собой Никки. - _Мама, мама_, - горестно повизгивала она, и волна ужаса пробежала по спине. - Ты наивна, Наи, - сказала она дружелюбным тоном, - что с ней сухо: без капельки юмора и с испугом обнаружили, что октопауки неодинаковы и их друг выбрался на середину зала - туда, где дорожка пересекалась с другой, уводившей из здания.

Они повернули к выходу из зала. - Значит, у меня по-прежнему такая застенчивая, - сказала себе Николь, опускаясь в кресло.

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